Projects

Oculogica Inc. of New York City is creating the EyeBOX, an eye-tracking based test to noninvasively and instantaneously assess intracranial pressure (ICP) in under four minutes.



Published on in CHOP News

The Pennsylvania Pediatric Medical Device Consortium (PPDC) has announced its latest round of seed grants to companies developing medical devices for children. The Consortium chose five projects from ten finalists in a competition to receive seed grants of up to $50,000 each.



Ostiio LLC of Philadelphia is developing a novel device for distraction osteogenesis (DO) within the cranio-maxillofacial skeleton.



SafeBoard, LLC of Youngsville, LA is creating SafeBoard, a patented extremity stabilization device designed to assist in the placement of ultrasound-guided PICC lines and IV catheters in neonates and children. Historically, repeated unsuccessful needle sticks and use of general anesthesia and sedation can be traumatic and dangerous to both the patients and their caregivers.



Myomo empowers individuals with a neuromuscular condition who have lost movement in a hand and arm to perform activities of everyday life.



Vifant LLC of Philadelphia is developing a digital platform that identifies vision acuity impairment in preverbal children.

 



Jacob Brenner, MD, PhD of the University of Pennsylvania is developing the DOVE device. Adolescents remain extremely vulnerable to the adverse effects of opioid use and overdose. During an overdose, individuals only have a matter of minutes to receive life-saving measures, including naloxone, an opioid overdose antidote. There is an urgent need for novel solutions that passively monitor respiratory drive and trigger automated responses to reverse an overdose when detected.



Clinical expertise and advanced technology come together to provide the best possible care to save the brain following traumatic brain injury.



FloBio, LLC of Philadelphia is developing a novel, point-of-care microfluidic chip and reader for rapid platelet function testing.



CoapTech, Inc. of Baltimore, MD is developing the Pediatric PUMA-G, which is expected to provide a safer way to place feeding tubes for children. Gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) provide a path for nutrition delivery directly into the stomach, bypassing the mouth and esophagus, for patients who have difficulty swallowing. Traditional technology used in these procedures cannot “see through” tissue, and G-tube malposition causes acute harm and other complications.